WX History: June 8th

1951: A tornado was captured on motion pictures for the first time in the USA.  Click HERE for the Weather History Blog post.

1953: The deadliest tornado in Michigan history struck the northern Flint community of Beecher, killing 116 and injuring 844 along its path. This F5 tornado would be the last single tornado to result in 100 or more fatalities until Joplin in 2011. Continued research in severe convective storms, improving technology, and the establishment of an NWS center dedicated to severe weather forecasting all contributed to reduction in fatalities over the past 6 decades.

Source: Michigan’s Deadliest Tornado – Mlive.com
1966: A tornado ripped right through the heart of the capital city of Topeka, KS killing sixteen persons and causing 100 million dollars damage. The F5 tornado, which struck during the evening, cut a swath of near total destruction eight miles long and four blocks wide. Television station WIBW covered a tornado live, dispatching crews to the southwest of Topeka, KS when the tornado warning was issued. Newscaster Bill Kurtis would be lauded for sounding the alarm with urgent warnings as the tornado cut a path across the city. The death toll would certainly have been higher without the station’s coverage. It was the most destructive tornado of record up until that time. 

June 8, 1966 Topeka Tornado

Source: NWS Office in Topeka, Kansas, and TornadoTalk.com

1984

1995: A tornado cut through the west side of Pampa TX (northeast of Amarillo), resulting in F4 rated damage.

2001: Tropical Storm Allison hits Houston, Texas, for the second time in three days. Louisiana and southern Texas were inundated with rain. Baton Rouge received 18 inches over just a couple of days. Some portions of Texas racked up 36 inches by June 11.

June 8th 2001 TS Allison
The image above is courtesy of the NOAA Satellite and Information Service.

Source: History.com and NOAA Satellite and Information Service.

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